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Kentucky constituents remember Breonna Taylor; Beshear wins as governor in red state against Cameron

Former attorney general, Daniel Cameron, was criticized for his mishandling of the Taylor case; he suffered a loss as the first Black governor because of it


By Black Headline News


Governor Andy Beshear, the nation's most popular Democratic governor, has won re-election in Kentucky--a major win for Democrats in a red-leaning state. It was a contentious gubernatorial race with attorney general Daniel Cameron having high hopes to become the state's first Black governor, especially with the backing of both former President Donald Trump and close ties to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. (Trump carried the state by more than 25 points three years ago.)


However, the mishandling of the Breonna Taylor case was inevitably part of the downfall of Cameron's campaign; constituents felt that he did not do enough as the former attorney general to penalize the seven officers who arrived in plain clothing to Taylor's Louisville, Kentucky apartment on March 13, 2020, via a no-knock warrant in the middle of the night. The officers did not announce themselves, the boyfriend fired a warning shot, to scare away what he thought were intruders. As the officers randomly fired 32 shots into the home of 26-year old trained medic, Taylor, died instantly on location after six of those shots fatally wounded her.

The officers were never charged with the wrongful death of Taylor, a shadow that Cameron would not be able to shake, all throughout his 2023 gubernatorial campaign.


The Associated Press called the race shortly before 9 p.m. on Tuesday night.


Gov. Beshear has a background as an attorney and politician who now serves a second term as the 63rd governor of Kentucky since 2019. A member of the Democratic Party, he is the son of former Governor Steve Beshear.

Beshear was elected as the 50th attorney general of Kentucky in November 2015 and served from January 2016 to December 2019.



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