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News Too Real Elections (11-1-22) - Let's take an in-depth look at the seven California propositions

Find out the difference between propositions 26 and 27


By ONME Newswire

Or listen here.

In this episode of News Too Real, show host, Julia Dudley Najieb reviews in detail the seven (7) California propositions on the ballot this 2022 midterm election.


Here is a review of the California propositions:


Proposition 1: Abortion rights in state charter

A "yes" vote supports amending the state constitution to prohibit the state from interfering with or denying an individual's reproductive freedom, which is defined to include a right to an abortion and a right to contraceptives.


A "no" vote opposes this amendment providing a right to reproductive freedom in the state constitution.


Proposition 26: Sports betting at tribal casinos

A "yes" vote supports this ballot initiative to (i) legalize sports betting at American Indian gaming casinos and licensed racetracks in California; (ii) tax profits derived from sports betting at racetracks at 10%; and (iii) legalize roulette and dice games, such as craps, at tribal casinos.


A "no" vote opposes this ballot initiative, thus continuing to prohibit sports betting in California and roulette and dice games at tribal casinos.


Proposition 27: Allow online sports betting in California

A "yes" vote supports legalizing online and mobile sports betting for persons 21 years of age or older, establishing regulations for the mobile sports betting industry, imposing a 10% tax on sports betting revenues and licensing fees, and allocating tax revenue to an account for homelessness programs and an account for tribes not operating sports betting.


A "no" vote opposes this ballot initiative, thus continuing to prohibit sports betting in California.


Proposition 28: Arts and music education

A "yes" vote supports this ballot initiative to:

•require an annual source of funding for K-12 public schools for arts and music education equal to, at minimum, 1% of the total state and local revenues that local education agencies receive under Proposition 98;

•distribute a portion of the additional funding based on a local education agency's share of economically disadvantaged students; and

•require schools with 500 or more students to use 80% of the funding for employing teachers and 20% to training and materials.


A "no" vote opposes requiring an annual source of funding for K-12 public schools for arts and music education equal to, at minimum, 1% of the total state and local revenues that local education agencies receive under Proposition 98.


Proposition 29: Impost new rules on dialysis clinics

A "yes" vote supports this ballot initiative to require dialysis clinics to have at least one physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant while patients are being treated; report data on dialysis-related infections; and not discriminate against patients based on the source of payment for care.


A "no" vote opposes this ballot initiative to require dialysis clinics to have at least one physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant while patients are being treated; report data on dialysis-related infections; and not discriminate against patients based on the source of payment for care.



Proposition 30: Tax millionaires for electric vehicle programs

A "yes" vote supports increasing the tax on personal income above $2 million by 1.75% and dedicating the revenue to zero-emission vehicle subsidies; zero-emission vehicle infrastructure, such as electric vehicle charging stations; and wildfire suppression and prevention programs.


A "no" vote opposes increasing the tax on personal income above $2 million by 1.75% and dedicating the revenue to zero-emission vehicle subsidies; zero-emission vehicle infrastructure, such as electric vehicle charging stations; and wildfire suppression and prevention programs.


Proposition 31: Flavored tobacco ban

A "yes" vote is to uphold the contested legislation, Senate Bill 793 (SB 793), which would ban the sale of flavored tobacco products.


A "no" vote is to repeal the contested legislation, Senate Bill 793 (SB 793), thus keeping the sale of flavored tobacco legal in the state.