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The New Citizens Press Review (pilot): Michigan, who are your executive branch elected officials?

Publisher Rina Risper reviews the current slate of elected officials and the voting process

By BHN


In this pilot episode of The New Citizens Press Reviews, publisher and show host, Rina Risper, reviews the current Michigan elected officials who manage the executive branch of government.


Risper also reviews how to register to vote in the upcoming general elections, Nov. 8, 2022.


Michigan is one of 13 states with a divided government with Democrats controlling the governorship and Republicans controlling both chambers of the state legislature. Since 1992, Michigan has had a divided government for 17 years, and a Republican trifecta for the remaining 14.


The Executive Branch

The Constitution of 1963 provided that the chief executive officer, the governor (and lieutenant governor), be elected for four years, and that the executive branch be grouped into no more than 20 administrative departments. The governor's chief responsibility is to enforce state laws and maintain order. The governor submits a suggested legislative program and a proposed budget to the Legislature, and appoints certain officials to various state boards and commissions with the consent of the Senate. Most state employees work in the Executive Branch under a comprehensive Civil Service plan.


Twelve state executive offices up for election in Michigan in 2022:


Governor Lieutenant Governor Attorney General Secretary of State State Board of Education (2 seats) University of Michigan Board of Regents (2 seats) Michigan State University Board of Trustees (2 seats) Wayne State University Board of Governors (2 seats)


Michigan's government follows the federal plan of three branches, executive, legislative, and judicial. In both the executive and legislative branches, elected state officials are limited in the number of terms they can serve in particular positions.



Governor & Lieutenant Gov.

The governor is elected to a 4-year term and is limited to two terms.


The governor's chief responsibility is to enforce state laws and maintain order. The governor submits a suggested legislative program and a proposed budget to the Legislature, and appoints certain officials to various state boards and commissions with the consent of the Senate.


NOTE: Voters cast one vote jointly for Governor and Lieutenant Governor


Secretary of State

In Michigan, the Secretary of State is not only responsible for elections, but also oversees vehicle registration and the licensing of automobile drivers, similar to a motor vehicles regulator in other states. The officeholder also oversees and regulates notaries public and is the keeper of the Great Seal of Michigan.


The Secretary of State is the third-highest official in the State of Michigan.


If the Governor and Lieutenant Governor are both absent from the state, or the offices are concurrently vacant for some other reason, the secretary of state serves as acting governor. Under state law, the Secretary of State must have at least one office in each of Michigan's 83 counties.


Attorney General

The Attorney General is the state's top lawyer and law enforcement official, protecting and serving the people and interests of Michigan through a broad range of duties.


The Attorney General's responsibilities include safeguarding the public from violent criminals, helping victims of crimes, leading the fight against human trafficking and opioid abuse, preserving Michigan's spectacular natural resources, protecting consumers and addressing illegal business practices.

By law, the Attorney General cannot provide legal advice to private citizens.