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W.K. Kellogg Foundation empowers HBCU Executive Leadership Institute at Clark Atlanta University with generous grant

$225K investment aims to help meet funding needs for cultivating excellence among future HBCU legacy leaders. Donation from one of the largest philanthropic foundations in the US reinforces the institution's goal of fostering equitable outcomes through strategic partnerships.


By Black Headline News


ATLANTA, Ga. -- Clark Atlanta University's HBCU Executive Leadership Institute (HBCU ELI) proudly announces receipt of a $225,000 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF), which will empower HBCU ELI to enhance programs for the incoming 2024 Community of Fellows, expand program reach, and deepen its overall impact on executive leadership development within the HBCU community.


The generous financial contribution aligns seamlessly with WKKF's strategic priorities. By supporting HBCU ELI, WKKF is actively advancing its commitment to racial equity, developing leaders, and engaging communities. Now in its third year, HBCU ELI has held a pivotal role in cultivating the next generation of leaders within HBCUs. Nearly 100 Fellows, representing a diverse mix of industries and sectors, have completed the program's robust curriculum and received micro-credentials to date.


"The Kellogg Foundation's transformative donation underscores our shared commitment to empowering future HBCU leaders and changemakers," said Dr. George T. French Jr., President, Clark Atlanta University. "With the foundation's support, we will continue to cultivate excellence and expand opportunities that ensure HBCUs continue to thrive."


"At the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, we believe in the power of strategic partnerships to drive positive change. Every investment we make, like our donation to HBCU ELI, is mission-driven," said Jeanne K. Wardford, program officer at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. "This partnership is not only intentional but also a testament to our goal of promoting equity and empowering leaders who will contribute to building a more just and inclusive society."


The grant from the WKKF will also enable HBCU ELI to implement innovative initiatives, including scholarships, mentorship programs, and leadership development workshops. Each program component is designed to address the unique challenges and opportunities faced by leaders within the HBCU community, fostering a pipeline of qualified and dynamic executives poised to make a lasting impact and become legacy leaders.


"We are profoundly grateful for the W.K. Kellogg Foundation's generous support," said Dr. Phyllis Worthy Dawkins, Executive Director of the HBCU Executive Leadership program and former President of Bennett College. "This grant will help elevate the Institute's capacity and amplify our mission to cultivate executive leadership excellence within HBCUs. Together, we will empower the next generation of HBCU leaders who will undoubtedly drive positive change in their institutions and communities."


The need for increased funding at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) is underscored by statistics from the United Negro College Fund (UNCF). According to UNCF, despite enrolling only 8% of all African American students in higher education, HBCUs graduate 17% of all African American students earning bachelor's degrees. However, HBCUs receive only about 3% of philanthropic contributions to higher education, highlighting a critical funding gap that impacts their ability to provide quality education and leadership development.



About the W.K. Kellogg Foundation

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, founded in 1930 as an independent, private foundation by breakfast cereal pioneer Will Keith Kellogg, is among the largest philanthropic foundations in the United States. Guided by the belief that all children should have an equal opportunity to thrive, the foundation works with communities to create conditions for vulnerable children so they can realize their full potential in school, work, and life.


About Clark Atlanta University

Clark Atlanta University was formed with the consolidation of Atlanta University and Clark College, both of which hold unique places in the annals of African American history. Atlanta University, established in 1865 by the American Missionary Association, was the nation's first institution to award graduate degrees to African Americans. Clark College, established four years later in 1869, was the nation's first four-year liberal arts college to serve a primarily African American student population. Today, with nearly 4,000 students, CAU is the largest of the four institutions (CAU, Morehouse College, Spelman College, and Morehouse School of Medicine) that compose the Atlanta University Center Consortium. It is also the largest of the 37-member UNCF institutions. Notable alumni include: James Weldon Johnson, American civil rights activist, poet, and songwriter (Lift Every Voice and Sing – "The Black National Anthem"; Ralph David Abernathy, Sr., American civil rights activist; Congressman Hank Johnson, Georgia District 4; Kenya Barris, American award-winning television and movie producer; Kenny Leon, Tony Award-winning Broadway Director; Jacque Reid, Emmy Award-winning Television Personality and Journalist; Brandon Thompson, Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion for NASCAR; Valeisha Butterfield Jones, Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer at the Recording Academy.


About the HBCU Executive Leadership Institute

The HBCU Executive Leadership Institute at Clark Atlanta University (HBCU ELI) equips high-potential leaders with tools and strategies that support the education and business goals of more than 100 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Through HBCU ELI's comprehensive curriculum, mentorship opportunities, and hands-on experiences, the institute prepares Fellows to take on executive roles and drive positive change within the HBCU community. For HBCU ELI program updates, visit https://hbcueli.com/. Join the conversation on social media @hbcueli; #hbcueli.


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